Thank you, Mr. Douglass
Ultimately, it was the men who voted in the fight for Suffrage. We honor the great abolitionist Frederick Douglas who spoke at the Seneca Falls Convention, Arthur Denny who almost swayed the Washington territorial legislature to give women the vote in 1854, and Harry Burn of Tennessee who was convinced by his mother to change his vote and cast the ballot that ratified the Nineteenth Amendment on Aug. 18th, 1920.

©2008 Linda Allen

Thank you, Mr. Douglass, you stood up straight and tall
Your words touched hearts and minds, you swayed the vote at Seneca Falls
The women stood beside you, 'til all the slaves were free
Then you stood for women's rights and her equality
Then you stood for women's rights and her equality

Thank you, Mr. Denny, you opened up the door
For women as they sought the vote in 1854
So thank you for your effort, but when all is said and done
If you'd included Native women, maybe we'd have won
If you'd included Native women, maybe we'd have won

Thank you, Mr. Harry Burn, Hurrah, you passed the test
You listened to your mother, changed your mind and voted, yes
She said, Hurrah, for suffrage. I'm watching where you stand
So be a good boy, Harry, and give Mrs. Catt a hand
Be a good boy, Harry, and give Mrs. Catt a hand